How can you Help Your Child Settle into a New Environment?

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It can be stressful for both you and your child when they are introduced to a new environment. It could be their first day of school, a new classroom, or a new childcare. It can be emotionally challenging for children to be separated from their parents, even just for a little while. Settling into a new environment for young ones is a huge step and it is normal if they are having trouble with it.

Here are 6 tips you can use to help your child manage separation anxiety and settle into a new space:

  1. Familiarise your child with their educators and classmates
  2. Ask if they want to bring a comfort object with them
  3. Establish a goodbye routine to prepare them for the separation
  4. Empathise with them
  5. Stay connected with your child
  6. Create a routine — a fixed sleep/wake-up time

With these 6 tips, your child will be ready to step into a new social environment and learn how to manage their anxieties and worries!

Read here to find out how you can use these tips to help your child.

The Importance of Sleep to Children’s Development

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We go through two states of sleep each night:

Non-rapid eye movement or quiet sleep — Your body physically repairs itself during this state.

Rapid eye movement or active sleep — This state is responsible for cognitive development.

Young children (0–5 years) sleep for more than half the day as a huge part of their physical and cognitive development takes place during sleep. Sleep deprivation in children can cause a significant impact on their behaviour, development, and mental & physical health.

If your child is having some trouble going to sleep, here are 3 tips you can use to help your little ones go to bed on time:

  1. Create a regular sleep routine
  2. Remove any external distractions
  3. Ensure a conducive sleep environment

These 3 tips are guaranteed to help your child get a good night’s sleep! It is also important for you to be aware of their sleep patterns and note any problems if there are any.

Read here to find out more about how sleep deprivation can affect your child’s development.

3 Ways to Help Your Child Break Out of Their Shell

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Building Social Interaction Skills

It can be tough to see your child struggling to interact with others in social situations. There are two components that should be met before they are comfortable interacting with others — understanding social concepts and using those concepts.

It is easy for children to understand the meaning and importance of social concepts. But most children struggle with putting those concepts into action. There are exercises you can do with your child at home to help feel more comfortable in social situations. These include:

  1. Coaching social behaviours
  2. Role-play
  3. Positive reinforcement

Going through these 3 exercises will equip your child with the necessary skills for them to interact with their peers at childcare or at school!

Read here to find out how you can use those exercises to help your child.

How Children Play and Learn Without Technology

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Our Children

Children are natural learners. By observing how the world around them operates, they instinctively become curious about cause and effect. As they progress through to adolescence from childhood, their minds are constantly analysing and concluding on what they observe(1). Our job as parents and educators is to provide children with the best possible tools and skills to kick-start their own individual life-long journey of learning. The 5 generally accepted learning domains are Science, Mathematics, Language, Health and Creativity. However, the challenge that parents are facing nowadays isn’t a lack of knowledge – it’s a lack of time.

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Introduction to Mindfulness

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What is mindfulness?

Webster’s dictionary defines it as the quality or state of being mindful; the practice of maintaining a non-judgemental state of heightened or complete awareness of one’s thoughts, emotions, or experiences on a moment-to-moment basis.

While a good explanation, this definition doesn’t capture the true essence of what we believe mindfulness is, especially in the context of caring for children.

Mindfulness is our ability to attend to the present moment, with curiosity and kindness. It is our ability to pause, assess what is happening right in front of us, and respond with clarity, as opposed to reacting based on our (often unhelpful) habitual patterns. It is a willingness to be present, and to allow what is here to be here… because it’s already here! Extensive research has been done on this topic, and the overwhelming conclusion is that we are happier when we are present.

The problem that we are facing today is that most people have not been exposed to these skills earlier in life, and therefore wish that they had learned about it sooner. Teaching mindfulness to children from a young age is an invaluable skill that will help them navigate the challenges of childhood and adolescence.

How can mindfulness be taught?

The question then becomes, ‘what actual techniques can we practice and teach to children to help them develop mindfulness?’ Mindfulness can be practiced in a lot of different ways – there is no catch-all method or solution to achieving it. The key message behind this practice is to live in the present more. There is a tendency among people to go about their day on ‘auto-pilot’. This can be changed by paying attention to the smaller things and letting yourself feel how each unique situation affects you. Another key principle is to focus on what you are experiencing and feeling. Too often people only focus on the external things in life, rather than turning inward and reflecting on how the external things make you feel.

Some key outcomes that can be learned through practicing mindfulness:

  • Non-judging: Become an impartial witness of your own attention
  • Patience: Give yourself the space to have whatever experience occurs
  • Trust: Trust yourself
  • Letting go: Not letting yourself get caught up by emotions

In conclusion…

These principles are vital to imprint onto children from as early as possible, to help prepare them for a life that will be filled with challenges and obstacles that will have to be confronted. By practicing mindfulness from an early age, future generations will be better prepared for dealing with those challenges without losing sight of what’s important.

Want to learn new techniques that will help to develop mindfulness in you and your child? Keep an eye on our Facebook page – We will continue to post articles and tips in the coming weeks!

 


References:

  1. Smegen, I. (2018). Mindful at School.
  2. Killingsworth, M; Gilbert, D. (2010). A wandering mind is an unhappy mind.

Piptree Curriculum – What is Emotional Intelligence?

The Piptree Curriculum is based on five principles; one of them is Emotional Intelligence. Emotional self-regulation is a major part of emotional intelligence and is a person’s ability to manage their experience and expression of their emotions. With lots of time and practice, a child can improve their capacity for emotional self-regulation. We can see that by the age of 4, a child may implement strategies to combat disturbing stimuli, like when they cover their eyes or ears when they are scared or hear a loud noise.

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