Energise Your Child with Mindfulness Exercises

, ,

It is important to balance periods of movement with time spent sitting still during the day for you and your child. Engaging in light, physical meditation is just as beneficial as a calm, sit-down meditation. A study published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine showed that acute physical activities enhance executive function.1

Executive function is a set of mental skills — memory, flexible thinking, and self-control — that we use every day to learn, work, and manage daily life. We start developing executive function in early childhood and this development can last all the way till our mid-20s. Trouble with executive function can impede your child’s focus, as well as their ability to follow directions and handle emotions.2 Read more

Guiding Mindfulness Exercises – Breathing

, ,

We all know how much of a challenge it can be to get a bright, bubbly and energetic child to sit still for longer than a few minutes. At certain stages of their development, the importance of ‘slowing down’ and reflecting should be emphasised. The exercises outlined below will assist you and your child in becoming more mindful of yourselves and others.

Talk to them beforehand to explain the exercises and why they are good for them. Play some quiet background music to help them focus. Don’t force your child to participate in these exercises if they don’t want to. Learning to listen to yourself is one important learning aspect of mindfulness. Read more

What can your child learn from mindfulness?

, ,

Children process a lot of information in one day. They deal with all kinds of stimuli and often change their attention from one stimulus to another. With so much information to take in, it can be overwhelming for your child.

Mindfulness is a good exercise to take the time to focus on yourself, be in the present, and acknowledge your feelings1. When you pay attention to your feelings for long enough, you can control how you feel by changing your thoughts and choosing to let go of the negative feelings. Read more

Fine Motor Skills Development in Children

, , ,

The development of fine motor skills in early childhood will affect the physical and mental development of your child. Fine motor development allows them to become increasingly independent. This can build confidence and increase self-esteem and will, in turn, have a positive influence on their social interactions and school success.

Your child will go through 3 stages of development before acquiring fine motor skills:

  1. Whole arm development
  2. Whole hand development
  3. Pincer and pincher grasp

There are many fun activities that you can do with your child at home to help train their fine motor skills.

Check out our blog post here for some ideas!